It’s always your fault…

“It’s always your fault if you’re any damn good at all.”

Ernest Hemingway

I love that quote.  It speaks to the heart of how great companies operate and how great companies THINK about the customer experience.  How many time have we all heard “perception is reality”?  In other words, if a member thinks your staff is unfriendly and rude, then that is their reality.  But that doesn’t take it far enough.

I was on a call with one of our larger customers that have done a spectacular job implementing their operational customer experience management program AND getting results across the board.  Not just with their customer experience metrics but financial results as an outcome of a greatly improved experience.  For the sake of this article I will call them, Enlightened Fitness Co.  No that’s not their real name so go ahead and use it in your next brand roll out!!

We were discussing some of the initial hurdles and how they overcame them.  She told me that some of the early feedback was hard to take.  I get it.  I have had the same thing happen.  You pour your heart and soul – and money – into your operation and someone says, “you suck.”  To overcome this they decided that a key teaching point would be “perception = reality”.  But they did more than acknowledge that a member’s perception was that member’s reality, THEY TOOK OWNERSHIP OF IT.  And there is a big chasm to jump from acknowledgment to ownership.  BIG.

On to another customer who we recently lost after a few short months – we almost never lose a customer.   They had implemented the first tactical elements of a good program but had not yet fully embedded all the practices that truly move a company forward.  But they were doing a great job closing the loop and following up with members.  Then we got word – “Please cancel us.  Our members only advocate for themselves and don’t think about the whole club.  The negative feedback has worn on us and we don’t want to see it anymore.”  Uhhhhhhh…..what to say…what to say….

First of all, I’ve been there.  You take it personally, which is actually okay and I believe important.  Bit as Enlightened Fitness Co told me – “You need to take it both personally and professionally.”  You take it personally so that you have the urgency and emotion to want to make changes.  You take it professionally so that you apply critical thinking and planning to actually make improvements.

But don’t give up!  Don’t whine that members “advocate for themselves”! OF COURSE THEY DO!  All customers advocate for themselves!  What the hell do you expect???  Customers aren’t there to stroke you.  They are there to give you a dose of reality – THEIR reality. Take responsibility for making your organization more fun and easier to do business with.  Fix stuff faster.  Be more helpful and friendly.  Clean better than you are currently.  Replace OLD stuff.  Paint.  Sing.  Dance.  And most of all, don’t kid yourself that your “member onboarding process” is great or even mediocre until you go inspect every aspect of it to ensure it is working as intended.  Then make it better. Make it a great workout experience and accept the feedback – then action it.

That’s what the “damn good” organizations do.